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Supporting Wildlife
Protecting Our Natural Resources
Conservation is Key
Water the Stuff of Life

Our Mission

At South Valley Water Reclamation Facility, we are tasked with treating wastewater 24 hours a day seven days a week 365 days a year.  We currently treat approximatley 20 million gallons of water a day.  The water discharged from this facility goes into the Jordan River and must be of a quality to meet the requirements of our NPDES permit. 

Treatment Process

Any water which you put down your sink, drain or toilet comes to our facility where the "dirty" water is treated to remove the contamination before the water is returned to the environment.  This is basically a three step process ... Learn more...

Conservation Tips

There are a number of easy ways to save water, and they all start with you. When you save water, you save money on your utility bills. Here are just a few ways... Learn more...

Recent News

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Pretreatment Technician Trainee Position Available

South Valley Water Reclamation Facility is accepting applications for a Pretreatment Technician Trainee. This position monitors commerical and industrial users, inspects permitted commercial users, maintain current, accurate, and complete related records and files, develop and maintain positive working relationships with business owners, architects, engineers, and developers during inspections. Applicat must be a high school graduate or equivalent, must maintain a valid Utah driver's license and must obtain a Grade 1 wastewater certificate within 18 months from date of employment. This is a fulltime position with excellent benefits. Annual Salary: $31,767. Physicial/Drug testing is...

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Clean Water. Part 2.

Clean Water. Part 2.

Last month, we began our investigation of Clean Water, particularly the history of water treatment. We learned that, as a direct result of water treatment, “By the beginning of World War II, typhoid, cholera, and dysentery were, for all practical purposes, nonexistent in the United States and the rest of the developed world.” It’s not therefore surprising that the CDC calls the last century of water chlorination and treatment “one of the Ten Greatest Public Health Achievements of the 20th Century.” 

As the incredible results of water treatment became more apparent, the U.S. Public Health Service set standards for water purity, standards that have been revised over the years, as new contaminants have been identified. Modern water systems carefully monitor water throughout the treatment process for traces of chemical pollutants and microbes; they have sophisticated computerized devices capable of detecting contaminants in the parts per trillion.

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